Don’t, no, DO get me started!

This week we have a guest post from my friend Taz.  It’s not the kind of thing we’d normally go for, but as I can honestly say that she lives what she speaks, I’m delighted to host this post for her.

Don’t DO get me started!

If there’s one thing positive to come out of Covid19 it’s the boom to the online fitness industry meaning that there is a wide range of workouts to choose from.  There’s so much choice from the king of PE Joe Wicks, to Kayla Itsines sculpting that summer ready bikini body.  But how do you choose an online fitness instructor that is right for you?

Choose a live workout:

It takes a lot of discipline to set aside time for a YouTube workout, there’s always something else that will crop up.  By signing up for a live workout you know that you have committed to being in front of the screen at a particular time, it’s harder to get out of!  Live workouts also allow you to connect in real time to the session, and the instructor can see you and provide you with guidance for important adjustments and well-earned praise.  A good workout should always start with around a 10minute warm up and finish with a cool down to protect you from risk of injury.

Workout your workout goal:

What do you want to achieve?  Are you looking to build strength, sculpt muscle, burn fat or a way to switch of and relax?  Set some short, medium and longer term goals, figure out what might stop you from achieving them and find strategies to overcome those barriers. There is always a solution to help keep that motivation in place.

Whatever the goal, you need to enjoy the process!  Whether it’s a strength circuit session, pilates, high intensity interval training, cardio or yoga, you have to think what is right for you and keep your eye on those goals, reminding yourself of what you’ve set out to achieve.  Telling friends and family what you want to achieve also helps to keep you accountable.

The Perfect Workout? 9 Steps to Find the BEST Workout Plan | Nerd Fitness

Combat the confidence:

If you are new to working out, the idea of starting can fill you with dread.  You will worry you’ll make yourself look silly, that you don’t know what you are doing or that you’ll not even be able to keep up with everyone.  The gremlins will creep in.  But the truth of the matter is that a good instructor should help take that away from you by guiding you through the session.  Everyone has had to start somewhere, learn the various movements and are continuously working on improving their own form. You’ll soon realise that everyone is focused on their own workout and very quickly you will feel familiar with your new surrounds, and more importantly, gain fitness.

Gym Anxiety – Fighting the Exercise Fear! – Exercise.co.uk

7 Ways To Overcome Exercise Anxiety (womenshealthmag.com)

Find the time and prioritise:

Your health is the most important and valuable thing you have, and it needs to be prioritised.  If our body is healthy, so will our minds be.  If our mind is healthy, we are happier and achieve more.  It’s an upward spiral of positivity.  So, whatever the barrier whether it be work, children, tiredness that generally takes over, try to make some tweaks to your weekly routine and find an online workout that allows you to do what you can.  Even a couple of short 15 minute sessions throughout the day will help you reach that recommended level of 150minutes of activity a week.

Get active your way – NHS (www.nhs.uk)

What now?

If you are keen to start working out and need a friendly helping hand, do get in touch at taz@tazfit.co.uk and we can do it together.  You won’t look back!

Taz x

THE DIFFERENCE

So what is the difference between Counselling, Coaching and Mentoring?

Image result for counsellingCounselling is undertaken by you and a fully accredited counsellor. On the whole you do most of the talking, the counsellor is only there to guide you in discovering the answers to your problem yourself.

Image result for coaching Coaching is much more thought of within the sporting and business sector, though not exclusively. The coach will guide and teach you on how to develop your skills. Whether this is at the gym or in your current role at work.

Image result for mentoring Mentoring is where the mentor and the client have a two way conversation. The relationship is very different to that of the counsellor or the coach. The mentor would help the client to up skill in whatever area the client requires. The role of the mentor is much more in line with being a good friend, big brother, or sister.

Of course all three professions are bound by the rules of confidentiality. The only time confidentiality should be breached is if the client disclosed committing an act of terrorism, harming someone else, or harming themselves.

In my role as a mentor I have guided my clients in many, many areas. These can range from helping university students manage their money, how to stay safe when entering new relationships, and how to work with their tutors. Often when working with autistic people I’ve helped them come to terms with their suspected diagnosis or how to seek medical diagnosis, to accept their differences but not to be ashamed of them but to own them. I have helped people understand what is blocking them from progressing. The client and I would identify what it is from their past that they have created as a truth, collected evidence to prove that that truth is true, but that “truth” has now become their roadblock.

So how do you identify which one of these three professionals you require?

Image result for three professionals

I guess the role of the coach may be the easiest of the three to identify with. For instance if you want a progress at work you may go to your up line and asked them to teach you the skills that are required. Or you might ask someone in your up line if you can be accountable to them for fulfilling your targets. Or maybe you want to lose a certain amount of weight and become fitter, therefore you might seek out someone at your local leisure centre or gymnasium for help, advice, and to be accountable to.

Becoming the client of a counsellor is often for a shorter period of time, for a specific problem. It is common to be initially offered one meeting a week for six weeks, which is quite often adequate, though this can be extended. Often the client goes to the counsellor with one specific problem, though when resolving that problem it may raise other issues. The role of the counsellor is to listen, not to disclose anything about themselves, nor to solve the problem for the client but for the client to solve the problem for themselves.

Like the counsellor the mentor may also only offer one meeting a week for six weeks, though it is common for this to develop into a longer period of time. The relationship is very much a two-way flow where the mentor will share about themselves and their experiences as well as the client. So for instance if the client is struggling to manage their finances it would be appropriate for the mentor to speak of how they have learnt this themselves, including hiccups along the way. Obviously, the mentor would not reveal in-depth personal information, but it is important that the mentor shows that they have empathy with their client.

On a personal note I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Counselling Coaching and Mentoring. Had I wished to have become a counsellor I would have had to take another year’s course equal to a Master’s Degree. At the end of that year I would have then had to register with a counselling association Image result for counselling associationbefore I went into practice. This is not required to become a Coach or a Mentor, in fact no qualifications are required, and you do not have to be a member of any association.

That being said, working with a trained, experienced Mentor like me is always advisable.

To find out more please contact us.

Defining the edges – meditation for those who don’t meditate.

I’ve been doing a lot of painting over the last week or so – the wall and ceiling kind, not the Michael Angelo kind.  I’ve painted in 2 colours – pink and black.  Not my choice, but not my living space, so our call to service means we serve, even if we don’t entirely agree with the choices.  The only limit on that is if supporting that choice would put the person or somebody else at risk of physical, mental or emotional harm.

Photo by Sandie Clarke on Unsplash

I hate doing the edges, particularly that fiddly bit at the top right-hand corner where three walls meet. Weirdly, I don’t find the top left corner so difficult.  Perhaps it’s because I’m right-handed yet left eye dominant.  This leads to interesting eye patches made out of tissue paper on the shooting or archery range, but that’s a story for another day…

Strangely though, I’m quite good at the edges.  If I can get to the point where I’m not thinking about it too much, the act of edging can take on quite a meditative state, from which I emerge with a peaceful mind. I’ve often, I discover after the event, thought through issues that were bothering me, or simply calmed my brain.

Noisy brain

My brain is a frightfully noisy place.  I have a theory this is linked to my high IQ.  I don’t say this as a brag.  I’m factually in the top 3% of the population, maybe slightly higher, but my emotional intelligence can be rather low. This is not always a great place to be for somebody whose job and study can involve interviewing people from an experiential approach.  Actually, I suspect my emotional intelligence can simply never get my IQ to shut up long enough for the emotional intelligence to come to the fore.

The noise can take any number of formats, the least comfortable always happens at bedtime.  This is when anything up to 3 or 4 songs can layer themselves in my head, in full, glorious orchestration.  There will almost always be a Latin number, Clare Teal’s 2009 rendition of ‘Tea for Two’, with the amazing Christopher Dagley on the drums, and often a rousing hymn from my Church of England/free church heritage. All of these are fantastic pieces or genres, which I love, but not all at once. These aren’t on loop. They are playing over each other, vying for prime position until the sheer cacophonous collage becomes overwhelming. The ONLY way to stop this noise, for me at least, is to listen to the spoken word as a I drift off to sleep.  This situation perplexes and disturbs my wife, who is convinced that my brain never has chance to ‘defrag’.

Finding the quiet
Photo by Le Minh Phuong on Unsplash

Classic meditation works sometimes, but this concept of sitting still and doing something for me strikes me as sinfully indulgent.  This is not an attitude towards mental wellbeing that I endorse by the way, just one I live with. We are all complex beings with flaws. Instead, I have a number of activities that allow my brain to wander into a place of quietness on its own.  These include edging the walls, audio typing for PhD students, heavy digging in the garden and sieving the compost.  The wonderful thing about three out of these four is that they also, so some extent, exercise my body.  They are however, often weather dependent, so I haven’t solved it entirely.

If you have a noisy brain like me, many of the classics – meditation, yoga, pilates and prayer, may work for you, and if they do, that’s fantastic.  If, however, like me, you need a kind of active trance, do let me know what it is. Then we can share with others and understand that whatever works for you, works!